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   passage of the 13th amendment. they're not even in the team of rivals. they're in the book "final freedom" and in other books. there is a really terrific, detailed depiction shun of the seward lobby in an old book pie john cox, politics, principle, and prejudice. if you want to read it the chapter on the seward lobby is masterful and freely available online through the internet archive. this lobby was real. the characters depicted in the movie are real. james spader the actor plays the tennessee attorney, real guy. okay? there is robert lathum and richard shell. these are real figures. but the actual behavior of the seward lobby is totally
   someone must be getting saved there. if there is any federal agency that could use it is the irs. i think people don't understand that the pastors are threatened. be careful and don't say political things because the irs will come out to get you and people accepted that without thinking what is it that government's job to approve the content of a sermon? >> it is amazing. 50 years ago, i would have say tearing up a bomb in the womanb. but now it is to political. and the practice of homosexuality is not acceptable. of course you can say it. now it is too political. and if i said marriage was one man, one woman. now today it is too political. we use to call bibliical and it is now political. and intimidates the pastors and
   [applause] we, the people, still believe that our obligations as americans are not just to ourselves, but to all posterity. we will respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. [applause]
   and people find it easy to use words on twitter. it is unbelievable to me that the world is still this way but it is. i can handle it. joining me now the is nick eaton. , a good amount of criticism, what did most fans probably not know about the seahawks corner back? >> well, i think everybody knows how passionate richard sherman is but i don't know whether people understand how articulate and educated the man is. he's its his third year in the league. he grew up in compton and he ended up second of his class in high school.
   >> ahora voy a donar tambiÉn una prÓtesis mÍa alguien necesitado. >> junior dejÓ atrÁs los cuestionamientos, el ahora quiere ser un ejemplo de superaciÓn para quienes se sienten o se han sentido relegados en algÚn momento de sus vidas, piensa que no hay dificultad que no se pueda superar, ni sueÑos imposibles de alcanzar. >> asÍ es, y aÑadiÓ que nunca dejarÁ de bailar y que muy pronto basta regresando a las pistas para ratificar, esta vez con dos piernas, porque es un excelente bailarÍn. esta es otra historia que nos hace sentir que nuestro trabajo vale la pena. y que gracias a personas como tÚ podemos cambiar la vida de muchas personas que no necesitan, por eso una vez mÁs decimos gracias, muchas gracias. y para irnos, los dejamos con imÁgenes de robin williams, que durante dÉcadas hizo reÍr al mundo y hoy lo hace llorar por su inesperada partida.
   because i'm not a villainous person. to those who would call me thug, don't judge a person a's character what he does on the lines. judge a person by what he does for his community what he does for family. and people find it easy to use words on twitter. it is unbelievable to me that the world is still this way but it is. i can handle it. joining me now the is nick eaton. , a good amount of criticism, what did most fans probably not know about the seahawks corner back? >> well, i think everybody knows how passionate richard sherman is but i don't know whether people understand how articulate and educated the man is. he's its his third year in the league. he grew up in compton and he ended up second of his class in high school.
   you've got democratic senator mark udall now calling for john brennan's resignation. also got senator martin hinrich, also a democrat in the senate intelligence committee. you've got another democrat, oregon senator ron wyden calling for potential criminal charges filed against whoever it was in the cia who spied on the senate. >> if a 19-year-old hacker searched senate files this way, that hacker would be sitting in jail right now. i want a public accounting at this point. i want to know who authorized this act. i want to know why they thought it was legal, and i want to know who is going to be legally held responsible. >> and now tonight, the first republican senator to all for brennan's resignation has emerged, not surprisingly, it is senator rand paul. president today said he has, quote, full confidence in john brennan as director of the cia, even as he went on to talk about the poor judgment the cia showed when it decided it was a good idea to spy on congress. joining us, siobhan gorman, the intelligence correspondent at "the wall street journal." thanks for joining us tonight.
   towell, let me go back whether these people should keep their jobs or not. parse generalably keith alexander's words and somebody could argue he wasn't lying, but i would say he was definitely misleading the public on that issue. the director of national intelligence james clapper was here in march and unambiguously lied to congress. i believe he was under oath. it sets a bad precedent for the whole organization to let him keep his post. i think you should be relieved of his post for lying to congress. he could have chosen other words to say. he could've said, "i can't comment." >> could he be brought up on charges of perjury? >> if this were any american citizen or civilian, they would certainly be prosecuted for what he just did. at a minimum, he should lose his post. >> do you agree with that, commerce member conyers? >> yes, ma'am, i completely
   we continue with our look at the history of jackson. this is american history tv on c-span3. to send into mississippi this summer upwards of 1000 teachers, ministers come a lawyers, and students from all around the country who will engage in what we are calling freedom schools, community center programs, voter registration activity, research work, work in the white communities, and in general, a program designed to open up mississippi to the country. did you hear me? >> with freedom summer, the idea
   over g.m.'s recent handling of safety issues with its cars. rutgers university needs to find a new commencement speaker. condoleezza rice was supposed to do the honors later this month, but today, the former secretary of state announced she was backing out. some students and faculty at rutgers had staged a protest because of her role in the iraq war. rice says she doesn't want to distract from what should be a joyous occasion. later, yet another use for drones in the sky. checking out storm damage on the
   gepp un reform is something leaders would want to embark on. >> there's a suction that everyone is collecting information, electric, cable companies - not just the n.s.a., but the n.s.a. through some of those countries. >> there's a huge fundamental difference between having the single company collect the engines, google can collect the google services and it's divided and fragmented in the hands of these companies. versus them collecting in a systemized way. there's a difference that the government can put you into prison and take your property. it limits what the government can do because we look to government and state powers as being threatening.
   tide washing machine cleaner. >>> the problem here is that there will always be some uncertainty about how quickly he can acquire nuclear weapon. but we don't want the smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud. >> condoleezza rice talking about the lead-up to the iraq war in september 2002 about something that was not true. joining us now is retired army colonel lawrence wilkinson. he has been a truth teller about
   say her name was also rice. (cheers and applause) that would be something! >> we do know that there have been shipments going into iran, for instance -- into iraq for instance of aluminum tubes that really are only suited to high -- high quality aluminum tubes that are only suited for nuclear weapons programs, centrifuge programs. >> jon: she knew that was bull (bleep) at the time. what would a john mccain or lindsey graham say about a woman like that's qualifications for secretary of state?
   way this has been filtered through the most trusted journalistic institutions in america, the way the government has had a chance to chime in on this and to make their case, and when you look at the changes that it's resulted in, we have had the first open federal court to ever review these programs declare it likely unconstitutional and orwellian and you see congress agreeing that massive surveillance, bulk collection needs to end. with all of these things happening that the government agrees all the way up to the president, again, make us stronger how can it be said that i did not serve my government? how can it be said that this harmed the country when all three branches of government
   wrong of the, unconstitutional, wrongfully withheld. i wasn't able to say anything about that. or why i felt that it was reasonable for me to risk my life in this circumstance as i had done earlier in the marine corps and elsewhere and vietnam but to risk my life to get the truths to the american people. snowden wouldn't have a chance to say any of those things, the sort of things he said to brian williams. he couldn't say those to a jury. the prosecutor would say, objection, irrelevant, as in my case. and under the current terms of the espionage act, the judge would have to agree. that's why the espionage act needs to be rescinded as applied to leakers. it was never meant to be applied to whistle blowers as president obama has now done seven times. it's not designed for that and it's unconstitutional in that capacity. and second, congress should pass laws that guarantee a public defense to anyone accused of breaking secrecy regulations by truth telling, by whistle blowing.
   surveillance, not about the man himself. do you think he accomplished his goal? >> yes, i do. i think that he needed to be out of the country in order to do what he has done, which is to guide several reporters that he's dealt with, bart gellman, lauren greenwald, very carefully through chat logs through the maze of arcane symbols and illusions through these documents. if he had simply dumped them on the web, which he could have done without any retribution, and he would be free and clear and back in hawaii right now if he had done that, they don't speak for themselves. there's too many symbols and code words that even i having had those clearances and been in the government wouldn't understand without someone informing me. so he's been able to do that continuously, and the only way he could do that was from outside the country.
   but senator mcconnell isn't the only gopper with a problem. here's majority leader eric cantor just last year. >> it is time to provide an opportunity for legal residence and citizenship for those who are brought to this country as children and who know no other home. >> then just last week, cantor stressed that he supports legalization for young undocumented immigrants in the military. but that was all in washington. back home where he faces a tea party challenger it is a very different message. here's a mailer that was actually sent out by his campaign. "conservative republican eric cantor is stopping the obama-reid plan to give illegal aliens amnesty." so which is it, mr. cantor? then speaker boehner reportedly
   >> so what i wanted to see if you could give me a yes-or-no answer to the question: does the n.s.a. collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of americans? >> no, sir. it does not? not wittingly. spy should have that big a tail. i have no idea when the normandy landings are. is it hot in here or am i just lying? here's how much this guy was rubbing his forehead. this is him at the start of the hearing. [ cheers and applause ] that's george stephanapolous' hair.
   his testimony before congress. >> senator biden made quite a lot about your exchange with him at the hearings last month. can you explain what you meant when you said there was not data collection on millions of americans? >> well, the -- first, as i said, i have great respect for senator weiden. i thought i was asked when are you going to stop beating your wife kind of question, which is meaning not answerable necessarily by a simple yes or no. so i responded in what i thought was the most truthful or least
   >> reporter: what have you learned the most here? >> discipline and [ indiscernible ] >> what is that? [ indiscernible ] >> reporter: what are you learning? >> not being a bully. >> reporter: not being a bully? and to have self-confidence? >> yes. >> reporter: yeah and to be strong? and what else? >> uhm, being nice . >> reporter: parents say hildago has his own kid magic because he relates to the youngsters so well. he demands respect and the kids listen. >> they say yes, sir, they say no, sir, ask permission to leave the mat, join the mat. everything revolves around discipline. >> as you might imagine, parents love james because they're learning manners, too, and discipline and respect and all those good things. >> that's great and at such a
   san francisco that's making youngsters sharper, smarter and a whole lot stronger. infin in the martial arts studio is this week's -- infinite martial arts studio is this week's "cool school." >>> reporter: nestled in san francisco 's cow hollow neighborhood, these tiny tykes are getting a workout. >> yeah! >> reporter: it's the infinite tae kwon do studio led by fourth degree black belt instructor james hildago a marine with a 20-year passion for martial arts. he is making sure our future generations have a rock solid base. >> it's not about the kicking and punching. it's about creating little ladies and gentlemen that understand what our society is about. >> reporter: in between kicks, these 4 and 5-year-olds are learning three core values, discipline, focus and respect while building self-esteem with each class and believe me, it's working. what are we learning this week? [ indiscernible ] >> what is that? [ indiscernible ] >> reporter: what have you
   happening domestically. specificallyhe nsa targets the communications of everyone. it interests them by default and collects them in a system that analyzes them and measures them and stores them for periods of time simply because that is the easiest, most efficient and most valuable way to achieve these ends. so while they may be intending to target some associate with a foreign government or some of the suspected terrorism, they're collecting your communications to do so. in the analyst at any time can target anyone anywhere. where those communications will be picked up and the authorities the analyst is empowered with, not all analysts have the ability to target everything, but sitting at my desk i certainly had the ability to wiretap anyone from you or your accountant to a federal judge to
   we've got to find this enemy we can't see. >> the definition of a security state is any nation that prioritizes security over all other considerations. i don't believe the united states is or ever should be a security state. ife want to be free we can't become subject to surveillance. we can't give away our privacy. we can't give away our rights. we have to be an active party. we have to be an active part of our government. and we have to say there are some things worth dying for. i think the country is one of them.
   were sworn to secrecy. alarm from both parties on capitol hill. republican jim sensenbrenner helped track the patriot act. >> i am angry, i wrote the law. the justice department and the nsa have abused this by going too far. >> jeff americaly. >> millions of phone records being collectly daily. where are you on your cell phone, who are you talking to, how long. all details except for the actual conversation itself. what else is being collected? >> both chairman of the senate
   not end bulk collections, regretfully. as mr. scott has said, our job is not to trust but to codify, and if you take a look at the selection changes made in the bill, it would allow for bulk collection should the n.s.a. do so. further, i would note that the transparency provisions have also been weakened. the 702 section would no longer be reportable by companies who receive orders, and instead of the attorney general noting decisions that change the law, it's now sent over to the director of national intelligence. regrettably, we have learned that if we leave any ambiguity in law, the intelligence agency will run a truck right through that ambiguity. i think that's why all the civil liberties groups have withdrawn their support from c.d.t., open
   u.s.a. patriot act. i served on the intelligence committee for over a decade and i want to deliver a warning this afternoon. when the american people find out how their government has secretly interpreted the pa patt act, they are going to be stunned and they are going to be angry. they're going to ask senators, "did you know what this law actually permits?" "why didn't you know before you voted on it?" the fact is, anyone can read the plain text of the patriot act, and yet many members of congress have no idea how the law is being secretly interpreted by the executive branch because that interpretation is classified. it's almost as if there were two patriot acts, and many members of congress have not read the one that matters. our constituents, of course, are totally in the dark. members of the public have no
   kind of crazy. i was going to july yard studying acting and i would do street performing mime in front of the metropolitan museum and the scariest people of the world with the ladies of madison avenue when you imitate them you would -- they would go get away from me, this is before botox, with their faces. even the animals. get away. performing was a get out and do it. it was that release for me. >> rose: but you, did you find instant response? >> oh, yeah. it was comedy, i think because you have to. there is very little stand-up tragedy. >> yes, yes, but -- >> it took awhile. i started off because i was also trained in the theatre, i could go off mike which was my style. so a lot of times people need the mook and be kind of -- and i would be like all ov the place. that was my attack style. an i would go for it and it seemed to be working right off the bat. >> rose: but did the training out of july yard help. >> big time. it allowed me to do two jews walk into a bar. it could happen.
   kind of crazy. i was going to july yard studying acting and i would do street performing mime in front of the metropolitan museum and the scariest people of the world with the ladies of madison avenue when you imitate them you would -- they would go get away from me, this is before botox, with their faces. even the animals. get away. performing was a get out and do it. it was that release for me. >> rose: but you, did you find instant response? >> oh, yeah. it was comedy, i think because you have to. there is very little stand-up tragedy. >> yes, yes, but -- >> it took awhile. i started off because i was also trained in the theatre, i could go off mike which was my style. so a lot of times people need the mook and be kind of -- and i would be like all ov the place. that was my attack style. an i would go for it and it seemed to be working right off the bat. >> rose: but did the training out of july yard help. >> big time. it allowed me to do two jews walk into a bar. it could happen.